Author Topic: Gun Use?  (Read 2819 times)

stevencc

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Gun Use?
« on: May 30, 2015, 11:06:29 PM »
I have a few guns that I rarely ever fire, is it recommended that i shoot them every so often to keep them working or does it not matter how long they go not being fired?

These are fairly new guns no more than 3 yrs old.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

MIO

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Re: Gun Use?
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2015, 07:19:33 AM »
There is no set rule because guns found in warehouses are good after 50yrs sometimes however cleaning and oiling them annually isn't a bad idea and when you do that take 30 seconds and do a functions check on the safety and actions and inspect the barrel for obstructions like spiders etc.
Safe Queens need love too
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

CongoHarry

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Re: Gun Use?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2015, 05:50:55 PM »
Quote from: "MIO"
There is no set rule because guns found in warehouses are good after 50yrs sometimes however cleaning and oiling them annually isn't a bad idea and when you do that take 30 seconds and do a functions check on the safety and actions and inspect the barrel for obstructions like spiders etc.
Safe Queens need love too

Yup.  "Rust never sleeps."  A regular routine clean/inspect goes a long way towards avoiding ugly surprises. Also, oils tend to migrate, attract dust, and some can turn gummy with age.  I recently inspected revolver that had been cleaned and laid idle in the drawer of a nightstand for just one year.  The amount of accumulated dust and crud that found its way deep into the lock works was astounding.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

bilgerat57

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Re: Gun Use?
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2015, 02:51:55 PM »
One thing that many users seem to overlook is magazines for semi-automatics. If you store magazines loaded, whenever you do a function check of your weapons, it's a good idea to clear and clean your mags prior to reloading them and storing. Some people suggest short loading your mags by one or two rounds to avoid over stressing the spring. I call that a personal choice. I have enough mags for each of my guns that I rotate one empty when I do my function maintenance.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

CongoHarry

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Re: Gun Use?
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2015, 11:24:00 AM »
Yep. And, don't lose sleep over whether to short load stored mags or not.  As an experiment, I kept two Glock 19 mags fully loaded (15 rounds) and stored for exactly three (3) years. Both had been previously used (approx. 500 rounds).  No cleaning or storage preparations of any kind.  Just loaded and stored away in a drawer.  After three years, both functioned flawlessly for a CHL  qualification.  Both subsequently fired another 100 rounds each without issue.  Both still running like a Swiss watch on the original mag springs today.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

bilgerat57

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Re: Gun Use?
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2015, 10:37:14 PM »
Quote from: "CongoHarry"
Yep. And, don't lose sleep over whether to short load stored mags or not.  As an experiment, I kept two Glock 19 mags fully loaded (15 rounds) and stored for exactly three (3) years. Both had been previously used (approx. 500 rounds).  No cleaning or storage preparations of any kind.  Just loaded and stored away in a drawer.  After three years, both functioned flawlessly for a CHL  qualification.  Both subsequently fired another 100 rounds each without issue.  Both still running like a Swiss watch on the original mag springs today.

With the advancements in metallurgy the more contemporary magazine springs are much better than the older ones. Those mags built 20 years ago or so didn't hold up as well. After a while, the springs would get weak if they were kept under pressure. They would function fine for the first few rounds but around the halfway point they would be more likely to fail to feed. The curse of being an old furt is you have a hard time adjusting to new habits when the old ones kept you safe.   *grin*  I know that newer mags don't require the extra care, but I feel better doing it anyway. :D
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »