Author Topic: Training and Practice Documentation  (Read 1692 times)

RevRudd

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Training and Practice Documentation
« on: October 13, 2015, 09:37:31 PM »
What information about training and practice is useful when preparing a case for use of a firearm? Is there a preferred format or media (paper, electronic, cloud-based, etc.)? During practice, I take a picture of the target, and record the firearm make, model, and caliber, and the type of ammunition (usually just bullet weight, sometime bullet type). If it's a course, I scan the certificate. I use Evernote to save it all. Would it be helpful to include a description of the drills? Rounds fired?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

TexasLawShield

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Re: Training and Practice Documentation
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2015, 04:08:07 PM »
RevRudd,

Your question is a little unclear. Please let us know the purpose of why you would need documented training and we will be better able to answer your question.

RevRudd

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Re: Training and Practice Documentation
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2015, 04:50:40 PM »
Every course I've taken give out a certificate of attendance or completion, usually with an admonition to keep it, in case you need to prove your competence in a trial. If the certificate is useful, I was assuming a record of practice might be useful also. I think I've seen Massad Ayoob say something similar. Maybe it's a location/jurisdiction specific problem.

TexasLawShield

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Re: Training and Practice Documentation
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2015, 05:02:24 PM »
RevRudd,

It never hurts to keep these sort of proficiency items just in case you were ever to need them. However, it is important to note that in a trial it is unlikely you would be trying to convince a jury that you are proficient with your weapon, but rather you are more likely trying to convince the jury that your use of deadly force was reasonable. In fact, it is possible that the evidence you have compiled would not be admissible due to a potential lack of relevance. That being said, it is often a good idea to err on the side of caution in these situations.

Thank you for your question.