Author Topic: Open carry  (Read 32739 times)

yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2015, 05:40:01 AM »
Tried to respond to Texas Law Shield's recent email asking for opinions on Open Carry.  Since I don't have a Facebook account, I replied to davidd@texaslawshield.com as instructed and access was denied.  What's up with that?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

Neighbor

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2015, 06:29:01 PM »
yabu, I did just like you and actually got a reply to my e-mail thanking me.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2015, 06:50:22 PM »
neighbor, I guess they just don't love me.
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CongoHarry

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2015, 11:10:58 AM »
Quote from: "Neighbor"
I like the "no revolvers" interpretation of the sticker signs on the bank. Was there a specific type sign that were required to be legal if a business owner wanted to keep guns out or would any sign work?  I doubt they called it 30.06 signage since that is a Texas law thing. Thanks for the reply - you are right in that some of the rules seem sort of strange (like no concealed carry where sell liquor but open carry ok unless told to leave???)


Oddly enough, during the 15 years I had my Virginia CHL, there did not appear to be any standardized signage for prohibiting concealed carry. I suspect, however, that by now they do have it, as I often heard law enforcement officers making reference to "30.06" before I left there.  Most likely the same signage as seen at our hospital entrances here in Texas. That's an awful lot of verbiage to read through before entering a building.  That's why training in CHL legal issues acquired through the Texas CHL classes and organizations like Law Shield is so valuable, and keeps you out of trouble.  Virginia for example did NOT permit use of deadly force to protect property, and only a CHL holder could travel with a gun in the car's glovebox.   The Virginia CHL only required a clear criminal records check and proof of competency.  That proof could be accepted in just about any form: documentation of specific military training, NRA hunter safety courses, etc.  You were on your own as far as familiarizing yourself with the law, and demonstrating competent weapons handling.  Despite that, I am surprised that the system worked so well. Most frequently occurring violations were those involving a firearm carried into a restricted area such as military reservation, federal facility, airport, or getting lost on the Washington D.C. beltway or I-95 corridor, and suddenly finding yourself in "enemy territory" (Maryland or D.C.).  In Northern Virginia, you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a military reservation, federal facility or a highway off ramp or detour that puts you in violation of the law.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2015, 07:48:41 AM »
Dan Patrick is backing away from pushing open carry now.  He says the votes are not there to pass it.  I'm shocked - I thought this was a slam dunk.
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MIO

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2015, 12:35:31 PM »
Quote from: "yabu"
Dan Patrick is backing away from pushing open carry now.  He says the votes are not there to pass it.  I'm shocked - I thought this was a slam dunk.
No slam dunk with people barging into offices and changed minds from being yelled at.
They won't vote against it most likely it will just never make it to the table. That stinks for you guys but looking in from the outside I know who I would blame. I'm seriously for open carry but until cooler heads that use their brains before their mouths represent the vocal majority this is how it may be.
We had the opposite issue here for several years with the liberal gun toters being the vocal voice and keeping it from passing or being tabled.
Better luck next year
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

epontius

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2015, 11:44:52 AM »
Looks like Dan Patrick has referred two OC bills to committees.
http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2015/02/ ... committee/
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yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2015, 08:57:06 AM »
The Open Carry bill seems to be on the fast track for passage now.  Assuming it does pass, is it really going to make much difference to the majority of Texans?  According to the DPS only about 2% of Texans have CHL's.  Since Open Carry will likely be restricted to those with CHL's then only about 2% of Texans will be able to carry openly - assuming they choose to do so.  This all seems like a tempest in a teapot to me.  Even if the bill passes, I predict most people with CHL's probably won't actually do it.
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CongoHarry

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2015, 10:40:22 AM »
Quote from: "yabu"
The Open Carry bill seems to be on the fast track for passage now.  Assuming it does pass, is it really going to make much difference to the majority of Texans?  According to the DPS only about 2% of Texans have CHL's.  Since Open Carry will likely be restricted to those with CHL's then only about 2% of Texans will be able to carry openly - assuming they choose to do so.  This all seems like a tempest in a teapot to me.  Even if the bill passes, I predict most people with CHL's probably won't actually do it.

Concur.  Open carry will be a useful option, but as for me, being the original "Grey Man," I prefer to maintain a "low profile."  This from John Farnam's "Layers of Response." which served me well during many overseas assignments:

" Layer One - Nonattendance. The best way to handle any potentially injurious encounter is don’t be there. Arrange to be somewhere else. Don’t go to stupid places. Don’t associate with stupid people. Don’t do stupid things. (First rule of a gunfight: DON'T BE THERE).

Layer Two - functional invisibility. We all need to practice to art of “being invisible.” It is in our best interest to go our way unnoticed, both by potential predators and by the criminal justice system alike.?Whenever I travel, particularly to foreign countries, I endeavor to be the one that no one notices; no one recalls; no one remembers. I silently slip through the radar, leaving no trace, a nameless, faceless tourist. When in any public place, I try to be clean and well groomed, but I never wear bright colors, any kind of jewelry, or anything shiny. I smile a lot, but talk softly and as little as possible. As we say in the law enforcement business, “Courteous to everyone. Friendly to no one.”


Words to live by.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2015, 12:29:55 PM »
Oh, I like that advice a lot.  That's kind of the way I live anyway.  I'm a quiet "on the side lines" kind of guy.  Life is a lot quieter and more peaceful when nobody pays much attention to you.  Thanks for the quote.
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LucasMcCain

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2015, 04:19:57 PM »
Like someone else mentioned, the main attraction of open carry for me is that I won't have to worry as much about accidentally flashing my gun. I will probably switch to an OWB holster most of the time. However, I will probably not walk around openly carrying. I agree that we should have this right, and I have no issue with people exercising that right. I do however have a concern, and it is this:

Right now, I carry a gun around a populace which is almost completely unarmed. They do not know that I am armed, and they don't need to. Some of these people would not have a problem with the fact that I carry a gun, some would have a problem with it, and some simply haven't formed an opinion on the subject. The passage of open carry will force the issue for many people. You see, right now "out of sight; out of mind" is largely in effect. Businesses don't see people carrying guns in their establishments; their patrons don't see people carrying guns around them; nobody complains; businesses don't see a need to put up 30.06 signs. However, let someone openly carry a gun in many of these businesses, and people will complain. The owners will react by giving in to the unarmed majority, rather than the armed minority. It isn't right, but history has taught us that something doesn't have to be right to happen. It only has to be economically advantageous. Even in Texas, we are the minority. We cannot pass open carry without expecting there to be repercussions. It forces the issue into the spotlight, and we all know the political leanings of the ones holding the spotlight.

Let me be as clear as I know how to be. I believe that an armed society is a polite society. I believe that openly carrying a firearm is my right, guaranteed by the constitution. I believe it should be legal everywhere. I don't believe it should be restricted in any way. However, I also believe that we should be thinking about what will happen if this does pass. Right now there are very few places in the DFW area where I live that have 30.06 signs. I run across them on occasion, but not often. I would like to keep it that way. If this does pass, I hope that there is very specific new signage involved which specifically targets open carry, and leaves concealed carry out of it. I would hate to see what should be a step toward greater freedom result in greater restriction in practice.
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yabu

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2015, 04:41:09 PM »
I worry about seeing more 30.06 signs if open carry passes.  For instance, Wells Fargo currently displays no signage concerning firearms on their premises.  Let somebody walk into a Wells Fargo bank openly carrying a gun on their hip and I bet 30.06 signs would start popping up overnight.  Every new 30.06 sign represents one more place you can't carry.  This is the opposite of what the open carry push was supposed to achieve.
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MIO

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2015, 06:14:00 PM »
What we see here in Oklahoma is more signs saying no open carry as opposed to no carry at all.
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mayfieldh

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #28 on: March 05, 2015, 07:46:16 AM »
I really don’t see a need for Open Carry in Texas.  I like the way the law is now with only concealed carry.  Why does someone need to know you are carrying and what good does it do for others to know.  I know I might get blasted for posting this, but who cares.  

I’m not sure what all is in the bill and don’t care to know since I won’t open carry anyway if it does passes.  But if it will be anything like Louisiana “Open Carry” law, then ANYONE 18 or over who is not a felon will be able to open carry (no license necessary).



Currently with conceal carry, the law says that even in places we can carry, we could be asked to leave for whatever reason if someone think you are or you will be considered trespassing if you don’t.

These businesses who post signs in their windows that welcome “Conceal Carry” does this for a reason which simply says to us that we can carry in their business “AS LONG AS IT IS CONCEAL” and we are license.  Now if and when this Open Carry law passes, what do you think they will do.  I can guarantee you that if lots of gun carrying folks (license & un-license) start coming into their establishment with guns on their hips and business has started to slow down, you will either see more “No Open Carry” signs going up or a security officer at doors telling you that you can’t enter with your weapon showing.

Just my 2 cents….!!  Think about it…
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

daniel8888

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Re: Open carry
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2015, 10:02:28 PM »
I'm pondering a thought and wanted to share.  I wonder whether we'll ever be passing forward from the stage of primitive cave men arguing who can pick up a stick and carry it.  Is the Texas Legislature putting us past such an idea?  Are we headed to pragmatic co-presence using technical methodologies (drones)?  Look at the history of weapons development: catapult, crossbow, cannon, rifle, revolver, machine gun, tank, bazooka, bomber, helicopter, submarine, cruise missile. Every step forward in weapons development consists of a physical step backward: the ability to kill your enemy with better aim at a greater distance or from a safer location. You can hit him, but he can’t hit you.  Conceal Carry, Open Carry, No Carry?  Shepherd with a cane, Shepherd with a dog; will the wolf pack ever go away?  At this point, I'd rather be a sheep dog than the sheep.  Yes, there can be less wolves dressed as sheep and as sheep dogs.  I'm trusting the Texas legislature will be our good Shepherds.
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