Author Topic: Shooting Down Aerial Drones  (Read 2931 times)

daniel8888

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Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« on: February 10, 2016, 07:36:23 PM »
I wonder, "you can shoot a thief at night (not during the day) that is stealing an article of yours inside your property at night and you are in fear of your life" and vs. "whether a drone hovering over my property I feel in alleged violation of Section 423.004 falls under that use of deadly force defense (not "use of force" which is different that of "use of deadly force"). I feared that the drone had physical accomplices outside or inside my property grounds?"  There is definitely one someone flying that drone at night. I fear for my life because there are even more.  http://www.hse-uav.com/texas_hb_912.htm

Katfish

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Re: Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2016, 09:24:55 PM »

certainly NOT a Lawyer here - that being said...............

"PULL!!!!!!"

jerryk

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Re: Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2016, 01:43:50 PM »
Honestly guys,

Do you have the right to shoot down a plane flying low over your house? They may have a TF lens on a camera!

Katfish

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Re: Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2016, 03:20:33 PM »

Last time I checked - planes cannot HOVER

if you're concerned about being identified wear a hoodie!

from this NON Lawyer's desk - an unwelcome drone over my casa will have to get pretty close to draw any fire from me.......but it's darn sure a possibility

daniel8888

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Re: Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2016, 04:40:49 PM »
The Texas Privacy Act is Texas's way as I see it prohibiting drones piloted by private and commercial means from taking images of Texans private property, property owners and their family or guests. It seems tnat only law enforcement, real estate brokers and utilities are allowed in specific special circumstances and at specific areas. Right to and prohibition of Search and seizures is protected. There are Civil Remedies for private property owners each episode images are taken. $5,000 for taking images and $10,000 fpr publishing the episode of the images. Civil Court as well as criminal Class B misdemeanor charges. Although the pilot is not or may not be committing a felony at night, the pilot has access and somewhat control of a person's property when lurking their drone at night above someone's property. Private drone pilots are prohibited from flying over private property. The fear of the extent of control (more bad guys on property) or the lack of knowledge of control over ones property at night; that control by someone else other than the property owner brings the fear for one's life. My opinion or rather my thoughts. So shooting down the drone at night may be just the start of an impending crime not the end. After the bang and clanking, LE non-emergency or 911/hangup, Call TLS? Is TLS comfortable with that? Or should we just stop at the last clank?

One wouldn't be shooting a person but a thing tin and plastic in their property so use of force or use of  deadly force mistakes are not at issue here. Again, my thoughts.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 05:11:51 PM by daniel8888 »

TexasLawShield

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Re: Shooting Down Aerial Drones
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2016, 03:34:00 PM »
daniel8888,

In a situation where someone is flying a drone over your property and you feel that they are violating the law, notify the police. We do not recommend shooting at the drone.