Author Topic: Regarding Intervening To Protect a 3rd Party in Virginia  (Read 16304 times)

jaeroo43

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Regarding Intervening To Protect a 3rd Party in Virginia
« on: July 26, 2016, 08:55:38 AM »
If I intervene to protect a 3rd party who is in imminent danger and I had to use force, am I also considered at fault according to VA's common law?

CongoHarry

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Re: Regarding Intervening To Protect a 3rd Party in Virginia
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2016, 07:17:01 AM »
"The Devil is in the details."  Specifics?

jaeroo43

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Re: Regarding Intervening To Protect a 3rd Party in Virginia
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2016, 02:10:30 PM »
"The Devil is in the details."  Specifics?
For example, u are eating at a diner and a waitress gets grabbed and then brutally assaulted by an unruly customer and no one wants to intervene. After I dial 911, I step in try to talk him out of continuing his assault. Now, he turns his attention on me and comes towards me. I use force to stop his actions. So that means am I still at fault?

CongoHarry

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Re: Regarding Intervening To Protect a 3rd Party in Virginia
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2016, 04:18:42 PM »
I am not an attorney.  Nothing in law says you must first endure a beating at the hands of your aggressor before you can defend yourself.  That being said, any use of deadly force, anywhere, righteous or not, will really complicate your life. Hence, I carry "weapons-grade" pepper spray as an alternative for scenarios as you describe.  Good comportment is everything: I make it a point to never deviate from Rule Nr. 1 of John Farnham's "Layers of Response":

Layer One: Nonattendance. The best way to handle any potentially injurious encounter is don’t be there. Arrange to be somewhere else. Don’t go to stupid places. Don’t associate with stupid people. Don’t do stupid things. This is the advice I give to all students of defensive firearms. Winning a gunfight, or any other potentially injurious encounter, is financially and emotionally burdensome. The aftermath will become your full-time job for weeks or months afterward, and you will quickly grow weary of writing checks to lawyer(s). It is, of course, better than being dead or suffering a permanently disfiguring or disabling injury, but the “penalty” for successfully fighting for your life is still formidable. A superior gunman is best defined as one who uses his superior judgment in order to keep himself out of situations that would require the use of his superior skills.”
« Last Edit: July 27, 2016, 04:20:15 PM by CongoHarry »