Author Topic: Carry with round chambered  (Read 10446 times)

aggie75

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Carry with round chambered
« on: September 30, 2014, 10:19:52 AM »
My son who is a CHL in Alabama asked me about this last night. Do any states that allow concealed carry is there a restriction on keeping a round chambered?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

yabu

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2014, 05:30:22 AM »
If a state allows you to carry at all, I can't imagine they would not allow you to carry a round in the chamber.  If any state does prohibit carrying a round in the chamber I will really be shocked.  For me, it makes no sense to carry a gun without a round in the chamber.  Why carry a gun that is not ready to be used when you need it?  Carrying a gun that is not ready when you need it is dangerous and could get you killed.  Just my opinion of course.   :shock:
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Staidan

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2014, 07:27:20 AM »
The only time my gun is NOT chambered is when it is stored.  :)  
Always have a round chambered!!
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mayfieldh

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2014, 10:31:38 AM »
If you don't have one in the chamber ready to fire, then what good is it to carry concealed.  Trust me, you won't have time to get one in there fast enough when needed..
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Neighbor

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2014, 09:50:46 PM »
Don't want to hijack this from the original question but not having a round in the chamber may not be as unacceptable as some would indicate. I have always carried with a round in the chamber, but I now have a situation where, if I want to carry at all, I am required to NOT have a round in the chamber. I have permission to carry at that location, but that was one of the stipulations. Is it idea?   No.   I do, however, believe it is much better than not being able to carry at all. (I am certain I can get a round in the chamber before I could make it to the vehicle to retrieve my weapon) I practice on a fairly regular basis and included is drawing and chambering a round prior to the 1st shots. Again I didn't say it was my 1st choice, but it is an acceptable compromise to me.
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yabu

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2014, 07:21:09 AM »
Neighbor, I don't know the circumstances that require you to not have a round in the chamber, but I was thinking there is a way to get around this if you are willing to carry a revolver.  You can always let the hammer (assuming the revolver has a hammer) rest on an empty chamber.  Of course pulling the trigger rotates the cylinder to the next chamber which, I assume, would have a round in it.  Just a thought.
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Neighbor

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2014, 06:51:22 PM »
Thanks Yabu, it is an option. At this point I'm probably not willing to give up 3 rounds. My Shield magazine holds 8 but most revolvers hold 6 when full or 5 if I meet the requirements of "no round in the chamber". Also it is easier for me to carry and switch out a 2nd magazine if the 1st 8 aren't sufficient. Like I said, it may not be ideal, but with some practice, racking the slide during the draw it isn't as slow as you might imagine. Yes, if it's a "quick draw" situation, I'm in trouble - I better hope he's a bad shot. In my situation, I guess I'm relying more on surprise and mental awareness than 1st shot speed. However, a bit of concern to me is that if a situation arises, I am aware enough to remember which way I'm am carrying - i.e. I carry one in the chamber any time I am not where I am required  to do otherwise.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

GlenWilbanks

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2015, 08:33:13 PM »
If nobody inspects your chamber to verify it is empty, just carry as you are used to. The odds are you will never need to use it, but if you do, just be glad you are alive to worry about  it then.
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CongoHarry

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2015, 09:52:28 AM »
Quote from: "Neighbor"
... I am required to NOT have a round in the chamber. I have permission to carry at that location, but that was one of the stipulations. ... I practice on a fairly regular basis and included is drawing and chambering a round prior to the 1st shots. Again I didn't say it was my 1st choice, but it is an acceptable compromise to me.

If memory serves, I believe that's known as the "Israeli Carry." As you stated, it's not ideal, but it is doable with the proviso that one consistently trains for it, and keeps recoil spring assemblies and magazine springs in top working order.  A note of caution: some pistols are ammo sensitive, preferring one brand/type of ammo over others.  My little Ruger LCP always experiences a stoppage (failure to go into battery) on the first round chambered when using Remington Golden Saber and Winchester Bonded Self Defense.  No problems with the remainder in the magazine after the first chambering.  No problems with any other brands of ammo.  So far.  Definitely NOT a pistol I will ever use for Israeli Carry.
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EdO

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2015, 05:05:57 PM »
I admit,  I'm old and kind of set in my ways,  but open to change. Since turning 72 and being in the apparent "victim" category for some members of society,  I've given a LOT of thought to what would be best for me to carry.

There's a lot of difference between the situation that I would normally encounter and that a Law Enforcement Officer (I hate acronyms,  22 years in the military will do that, so no LEO) will encounter.  If there's trouble they are there to take care of the problem and will most likely be advancing toward it.  I am trying to avoid it and getting out of Dodge as quickly as I can, not get involved in a prolonged fire fight.  Checking statistics,  I found that the number of rounds fired in a self defence situations is normally 1 to 3.   Taking all that into account,  my firearm of choice is a S&W Mod 60 in .357 mag.  It conceals very well and hits awfully hard.   I carry a speed loader and a "just in case" .380 revolver (loaded without "clips" which can be troublesome) in my weak side pocket.  If 5 rounds of .357 doesn't get the job done, it probably isn't going to get done.  The .380 is there for back up.   Why revolvers?   I've shot enough semi-auto's over the years to develop a mis-trust of them.  They almost always work,  but I still don't trust them.  I don't hate them,  even have a few,  but when push comes to shove,  I'm a revolver guy.  They always seem to work.  I realize that what works for me doesn't work for everyone.  I love my semi's,  but not enough to quit carrying revolvers.
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stealth

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2015, 08:55:58 PM »
I'm unaware of any states that allow carry but stipulate that a round can't be chambered.

I think there was a state, maybe Cali? that has something like unloaded open carry for a period of time, but if I recall correctly the firearm had to be completely empty, not just with an empty chamber.
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cobra2

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Re: Carry with round chambered
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2015, 08:24:50 AM »
Some people feel that if you carry without one in the hole and that if somehow someone else gets control of your gun and tries to shoot you, the first trigger pull will fail and give you time to regain control of the weapon.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »