Author Topic: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun  (Read 5689 times)

stevetays

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Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« on: December 16, 2014, 07:34:30 PM »
What ?? To my surprise, I went to a new Family Physician due to relocating and one of the questions asked was do I own a gun.
My response, why yes, doesn't everyone?

Is this part of the new CDC thing or what?

I shouldn't have to lie but it may of been the safer bet knowing where this can go.

Any one else experience this?  and what did you say or do???

THX
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

BMAG

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2014, 08:04:52 PM »
THAT SHOULD BE A NEED TO KNOW BASIS ! ONLY YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SHOULD KNOW. I FEEL IT'S NOT ANYONE ELSE'S BUSINESS.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

Neighbor

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2014, 04:51:37 PM »
I've heard of this question being asked but so far hasn't happened to me. I agree it is not any of their business but if I say that, it would probably be assumed it meant yes. I also don't like to lie, but don't really know the best way around this question. Maybe change doctors??
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

MIO

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2014, 05:22:16 PM »
It is on almost every questionnaire in doctors offices. They believe that if you are around guns then it is comparable to you smoking and it puts you in a higher risk. Leave it blank if you are not comfortable in lying as it does nothing to benifit you in answering it.
There was a case on one if the national geographic doomsday preppers who went to the dr and got sideways with him and lost his right to have a gun. I'm not saying the dr was wrong but if you don't tell them them it can't happen with you.
OPSEC
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

stevetays

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2014, 08:58:37 PM »
Thanks for the replies.
Maybe we should bring this up to our Conservative Legislators and ask they present a bill that prohibits this type of questioning?
This has to fall under some type of existing law regarding our privacy, or something.
If at some point my Doctor believes I may have, even a mild case, of schizophrenia, then notifying the FBI or other LEO I could loose everything.
That's just wrong.  
I'll stop there before I go into my Tyrant regarding where this countries heading. :evil:
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

TexasLawShield

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2014, 10:02:36 AM »
stevetays,

We have heard of doctors asking about firearms ownership, though most of the time this happens at the VA instead of with a civilian GP. As far as we know, thereís no mandate that they start asking this question. Your doctor can legally ask you about your guns, but you donít have to be honest with them or respond at all if it makes you uncomfortable. Because of medical privacy laws, your doctor wonít be able to share this information if you do choose to respond.

Thank you for your question.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

Albannach

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2014, 12:14:39 PM »
Speaking strictly for myself, I would file a formal complaint against the physician with the state medical board.  Asking about firearms ownership has nothing whatsoever to do with the practice of medicine and is inappropriate.  Indeed it is no more relevant than the model of car a patient drives of what kind of music they like to listen to.  Of course, if you file a complaint against the physician, you can be sure the physician will not agree to be your physician in the future, but I'd recommend changing physicians anyway.

The fact that a person does or does not own a firearm is not a legitimate question for any healthcare practitioner to ask unless there is clear evidence that the person may be at risk of harming themselves or others. However, some physicians started routinely asking about firearms ownership several years ago when the American Medical Association officially adopted an anti Second Amendment stance.  

If you encounter a question about firearms ownership on a new patient questionnaire, you have the option of leaving it blank as one of the previous commenters suggested or you could answer the question by writing that it is an inappropriate question to ask because has nothing to do with the practice of medicine and you are seeking healhcare from a physician, not a politician. That would put the physician on notice to back-off.  If the physician even mentions what you wrote, get another physician.

Medical doctors have done a good job of putting themselves in a "one up" position and intimidating people into not questioning them.  Don't let yourself be treated that way.  Never hesitate to consider your first meeting with a new physician as a bi-lateral "interview".  You have every right to ask them about their own opinions and stances on things like firearms ownership.  If you don't get answers you are comfortable with, "fire" them and go elsewhere.  

Re the Centers for Disease Control:  Nowadays it tracks firearms-related injuries and fatalities for purely political, not health-related reasons. It began legitimately enough with tracking gunshot wounds treated at hospitals.  However, anti Second Amendment politicians at one point realized they could use the data to further their agendas.  As a result, CDC received a mandate to expand firearms-related data collection activities.  Like all forms of statistical information, it is possible to shape the scenario based on how the data gets collected.  Or, put another way, the answers one gets depend on the questions one asks. Thus, a lot of CDC data is biased.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

thammonds

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2015, 07:28:05 PM »
I am having a different issue. I have always carried my piece with me when visiting my Family Doctor of (35) years. A couple visits ago I found a 30.06 sign on the door. Needles to say I left my piece in the truck. I spoke with the Doctor about the new sign and he said a group of doctors suggest it was the thing too do. But he personally had no issues with me carring consealed when visiting him (since he knows my mental condition and knows I would protect him and all the others within the facilities). I explained I could not proceed past that sign. He offered me a signed paper to allow me to carry. But I told him I don't know if he can do that legally.
   OK, now the question is would that paper hold up in court?
Tim
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

TexasLawShield

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2015, 03:17:11 PM »
thammonds,

Unfortunately, written permission is not a statutory exception to 30.06. If you were charged with unlawful carry, you could certainly try presenting the letter to a judge and/or jury in hopes you would be acquitted. There has not to my knowledge been a case like this before, so unless you want to be the test case for written authorization, Iíd recommend you leave your gun in the car.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »

Neighbor

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2015, 04:58:09 PM »
Does the doctor understand the the sign is only keeping the "good guys" from bringing in the guns?
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thammonds

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Re: Family Practitioner asking if I own a gun
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2015, 09:23:01 AM »
Yes the Doctor knows this. I expressed the same to him, which is why he suggested the permission paper. Got a feeling he does not want to push against the other doctors, even tho he is the big dog. So I will not push the issue.
Tim
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Guest »